Monday, July 14, 2014
There was a pond behind my childhood home in Warwick, NY we called the “Cow Pond” on account of the cows that drank from it. There was a story attached to this pond that a couple had drowned there during the winter after trying to cross over the ice - so this place held a lot of mystery for me. It most likely would have, regardless of any rural myth, since there was such an abundance of wildlife present. I remember seeing a mink chasing a muskrat along the muddy banks during the summer. At the same time I was watching a lot of horror films and reading horror magazines like Fangoria… sometime around 1982. This would only cause me to imagine supernatural beings lurking in the fields behind my house, living in the pond along with the frogs and snakes, the mink and the muskrats.
Scott Daniel Ellison ‘Iowa, Ohio’
Take advantage of our current promotion in celebration of Schilt Publishing’s five year anniversary, buy ‘Iowa, Ohio’ from our webstore and you will receive a extra book as a gift!

There was a pond behind my childhood home in Warwick, NY we called the “Cow Pond” on account of the cows that drank from it. There was a story attached to this pond that a couple had drowned there during the winter after trying to cross over the ice - so this place held a lot of mystery for me. It most likely would have, regardless of any rural myth, since there was such an abundance of wildlife present. I remember seeing a mink chasing a muskrat along the muddy banks during the summer. At the same time I was watching a lot of horror films and reading horror magazines like Fangoria… sometime around 1982. This would only cause me to imagine supernatural beings lurking in the fields behind my house, living in the pond along with the frogs and snakes, the mink and the muskrats.

Scott Daniel Ellison ‘Iowa, Ohio’

Take advantage of our current promotion in celebration of Schilt Publishing’s five year anniversary, buy ‘Iowa, Ohio’ from our webstore and you will receive a extra book as a gift!

Wednesday, May 28, 2014
Some great events coming up over the next month:
Book launch of Basement Sanctuaries by Gesche Würfel.Word Up Community Bookshop, New York City, USASaturday 31st May, 4-6pmhttp://wordupbooks.wordpress.com/
Book signing and live interview with Jane Hilton to celebrate her two books, Dead Eagle Trail and Precious, and her new exhibition in Amsterdam.PhotoQ Bookshop, Amsterdam, The NetherlandsMonday 2nd June, 8pmhttp://photoq.nl/fotografefilmmaakster-jane-hilton-op-2-juni-de-photoq-bookshop/
A day of presentations and discussions organised by World Press Photo and Human Rights Watch to celebrate the end of their two-year-long project Reporting Change. Stories of Change - Beyond the ‘Arab Spring’ will also be launched at the event.Melkweg, Amsterdam, The NetherlandsSunday 15th June, 1-6pm (Tickets €8.50 each, must be bought in advance)http://www.melkweg.nl/nl/agenda/reporting-change-stories-from-the-arab-region-15-06-2014
Presentation and book signing of Robert King’s Democratic Desert - The War in Syria.Frontline Club, London, UKWednesday 25th June, 7pm (Tickets £16.50 each, must be bought in advance)http://www.frontlineclub.com/frontline-showcase-photographing-the-world/
Talk by Chris Harrison involving I Belong Jarrow and his new series Copper Horses.The North of England Institute of Mining, Newcastle, UKThursday 26th June, 6.30pmhttps://www.mininginstitute.org.uk/
For more information about any of these events, or anything else, please email: press@schiltpublishing.com

Some great events coming up over the next month:

Book launch of Basement Sanctuaries by Gesche Würfel.
Word Up Community Bookshop, New York City, USA
Saturday 31st May, 4-6pm
http://wordupbooks.wordpress.com/

Book signing and live interview with Jane Hilton to celebrate her two books, Dead Eagle Trail and Precious, and her new exhibition in Amsterdam.
PhotoQ Bookshop, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Monday 2nd June, 8pm
http://photoq.nl/fotografefilmmaakster-jane-hilton-op-2-juni-de-photoq-bookshop/

A day of presentations and discussions organised by World Press Photo and Human Rights Watch to celebrate the end of their two-year-long project Reporting Change. Stories of Change - Beyond the ‘Arab Spring’ will also be launched at the event.
Melkweg, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Sunday 15th June, 1-6pm (Tickets €8.50 each, must be bought in advance)
http://www.melkweg.nl/nl/agenda/reporting-change-stories-from-the-arab-region-15-06-2014

Presentation and book signing of Robert King’s Democratic Desert - The War in Syria.
Frontline Club, London, UK
Wednesday 25th June, 7pm (Tickets £16.50 each, must be bought in advance)
http://www.frontlineclub.com/frontline-showcase-photographing-the-world/

Talk by Chris Harrison involving I Belong Jarrow and his new series Copper Horses.
The North of England Institute of Mining, Newcastle, UK
Thursday 26th June, 6.30pm
https://www.mininginstitute.org.uk/

For more information about any of these events, or anything else, please email: press@schiltpublishing.com

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

INQUIRING PHOTOGRAPHER

Earlier this spring Mary Bisbee-Beek and Joshua Lutz had a conversation about his new venture Magical Thinking, here are some things that they discussed:

Q: Can you tell us the story behind the start of Magical Thinking?

A: It really just started out from a few conversations about photography, trying to understand it, what it is, and how it functions. These things seem far more important to me than what it means to make good pictures.

Q: Who or what inspired you during the making of this project, and can you talk a little bit about the leap from being published as a photographer/author to being the publisher?

A: I don’t think of it as separate things, although perhaps I should. Photography for me has shifted in that it is more about conversations than it is about any sort of declarative statement. Perhaps it used to be more about showing how good you were at the medium. That said, I found myself in a position where I could work with other artists to help their ideas come to fruition. In most cases the people I am working with, I have been working with for many years so it is a very seamless transition to publishing the books.

Q: The first three books, ‘Probable Cause’, ‘One No One And One Hundred Thousand’ and ‘Iowa, Ohio’, are all of unique subject matter - what were some of the criteria for choosing these first three photographers/artists?

A: I wanted them to reach to these disparate areas of interest. There is ‘Iowa, Ohio’ a book of paintings and found photographs by Scott Daniel Ellison whom I have been a fan of for many years. I lost a battle to have one of Scott’s paintings be the original cover of my first book ‘Meadowlands’. I still think it would have made a better cover than my photograph. Matt Gunther’s ‘Probable Cause’ falls more in the traditional documentary route with a long term investigation into the very nature of authority. While ‘One No One And One Hundred Thousand’ reaches more to a place that questions the notion of documentary photography and creates a very personal journey of discovery under the guise of looking at this mysterious place.

Q: Magical Thinking is a non-profit initiative - what are some of the educational or outreach components that you might be planning for any of these books or in the future?

A: Basically we are looking to have more broad reaching conversations using each book as a jumping off point and seeing wherever they may land. Our first outreach is in the form of books, but it might also be a lecture or a exhibition. Our first discussion is taking place at a small gathering of people in upstate New York for drinks and discussions about photography, and in a few months we are going to open things up to much larger audiences and partnering with different groups to do so.

Q: On your nightstand now - or what are you reading?

A: ‘Artists in Times of War’ by Howard Zinn has been there for way too long. Lately I cant get through much before falling asleep. Although, I did just finish ‘Blood Meridian’ by Cormac McCarthy. There is also something by Joyce Carol Oates but that’s only there so my wife stops saying I don’t read female authors.
    
Q: What was your favorite book as a child?

A: More embarrassing questions - I wasn’t a big reader as a kid. Even in college I only read what was assigned. It’s only recently that I’ve been playing catch up. Really, there are these huge gaps of important books that everyone has read that I avoided forever. Moby Dick, I’m talking about you! I do read a lot to my kids. I love the Jon Muth books, ‘Zen Ties’, ‘Zen Shorts’ and ‘The Three Questions’. The main character in them, a panda named Stillwater is probably as close to Santa Claus as we get.

Monday, May 12, 2014

theangrybat:

Lorena Ros - Unspoken

author: http://www.lorenaros.com/

publisher: http://www.schiltpublishing.com/

ISBN: 978-90-5330-814-1

video: https://vimeo.com/92459504

Wednesday, May 7, 2014

Back at Offizin Scheufele this week to print ‘Stories of Change - Beyond the ‘Arab Spring” with World Press Photo’s Kari Lundelin.

Tuesday, May 6, 2014
Schilt Publishing Jul-Dec 2014 CatalogueOur new catalogue for July - December 2014!
Announcing books by Diana Matar, Anna Fox, Lauren Fleishman, Elliot Ross, Camille Renée Devid, Donald Weber & Arthur Bondar, and World Press Photo Next #04

Schilt Publishing Jul-Dec 2014 Catalogue
Our new catalogue for July - December 2014! Announcing books by Diana Matar, Anna Fox, Lauren Fleishman, Elliot Ross, Camille Renée Devid, Donald Weber & Arthur Bondar, and World Press Photo Next #04

Saturday, April 26, 2014
mediaspacelondon:

WHY I LIKE THIS by Chris Harrison
Clap your hands for daddyComing down the wagon way,A pocket full of moneyAnd a bag full of hay.- Traditional Northumbrian nursery rhyme
Since the invention of photography, history has been reduced to a series of single images. Think of the Iraq War and the image of a hooded figure standing on a box is conjured up. The Jarrow Crusade conjures an image of cloth capped men walking with a banner.
Our culture, seemingly overflowing with so much available visual information, has paradoxically been reduced to a series of visual bites. We have stopped questioning these images. We just reproduce them and they have become memes. So many images tell us the ‘What’ and the ‘Where’. How many images make us stop and ask ‘Why’?
Palmer’s Shipyard closed in 1936. Overnight, Jarrow’s unemployment rate became 72.9% [sic]. There was no safety net. Without work you didn’t eat. And more importantly for the men of Jarrow, their families didn’t eat. Infant mortality in Jarrow skyrocketed. 
So for the Jarrow March, what was the ‘Why’? This image, which has been accidentally ‘iconised’ by a newspaper layout artist, is the ‘Why’. The men of Jarrow marched to London because they loved their children.
Chris Harrison was the Bradford Fellow in Photography 2012-2013. His Fellowship culminated with a new body of work, Copper Horses (National Media Museum, Bradford, November 2013 to February 2014). A reflection on identity, class and British industry, the exhibition was the result of Chris thinking about his relationship with his dad and how it has changed over the years. With Copper Horses Chris wanted to “instil a feeling of pride in the skill and creativity of ordinary people in what they do for a living.” His book, I Belong Jarrow (2013), is published by Schilt. 
Image: A Jarrow marcher bids farewell to his child, 5 October 1936, unknown photographer / Central Press Photos Ltd © National Media Museum, Bradford / SSPL. Creative Commons BY-NC-SA

mediaspacelondon:

WHY I LIKE THIS by Chris Harrison

Clap your hands for daddy
Coming down the wagon way,
A pocket full of money
And a bag full of hay.
- Traditional Northumbrian nursery rhyme

Since the invention of photography, history has been reduced to a series of single images. Think of the Iraq War and the image of a hooded figure standing on a box is conjured up. The Jarrow Crusade conjures an image of cloth capped men walking with a banner.

Our culture, seemingly overflowing with so much available visual information, has paradoxically been reduced to a series of visual bites. We have stopped questioning these images. We just reproduce them and they have become memes. So many images tell us the ‘What’ and the ‘Where’. How many images make us stop and ask ‘Why’?

Palmer’s Shipyard closed in 1936. Overnight, Jarrow’s unemployment rate became 72.9% [sic]. There was no safety net. Without work you didn’t eat. And more importantly for the men of Jarrow, their families didn’t eat. Infant mortality in Jarrow skyrocketed. 

So for the Jarrow March, what was the ‘Why’? This image, which has been accidentally ‘iconised’ by a newspaper layout artist, is the ‘Why’. The men of Jarrow marched to London because they loved their children.

Chris Harrison was the Bradford Fellow in Photography 2012-2013. His Fellowship culminated with a new body of work, Copper Horses (National Media Museum, Bradford, November 2013 to February 2014). A reflection on identity, class and British industry, the exhibition was the result of Chris thinking about his relationship with his dad and how it has changed over the years. With Copper Horses Chris wanted to “instil a feeling of pride in the skill and creativity of ordinary people in what they do for a living.” His book, I Belong Jarrow (2013), is published by Schilt. 

Image: A Jarrow marcher bids farewell to his child, 5 October 1936, unknown photographer / Central Press Photos Ltd © National Media Museum, Bradford / SSPL. Creative Commons BY-NC-SA

Monday, March 24, 2014
Read Maarten’s diary from his experience at FotoFest last week, published on L’Oeil de la Photographie:

"Friday March 14 my wife and business partner Maria Louise and I arrived in Houston for the 2014 FotoFest Biennial. It is always such a pleasure to be back in Houston! We love it here! The city is interesting and thriving, and the people are very kind and open.
We’ll be here for a week. In 4 days we’ll review work from about 70 mostly very talented photographers in the downtown DoubleTree Hotel, FotoFest’s headquarter during the Biennials. Of course we’ll attend the official opening and will see during the week the complete and huge show View From Inside on contemporary Arab photography, which is spread over four different locations: the Spring Street, Winter Street and Silver Street Studios, and Williams Tower. The first three are superbly renovated old industrial buildings located in Houston’s rapidly developing First Ward. Williams Tower is a beautiful 64 stories skyscraper designed by Philip Johnson in collaboration with both New York and Houston architects, and is located uptown. The ground floor of this chic office building is public exhibition space.
The Arab show is amazing. The work of 49 top quality artists from different Arab countries was selected by curator Karin Adrian von Roques, a German leading specialist in Arab art, together with FotoFest’s artistic Director and founder Wendy Watriss and her assistant Jennifer Ward. Congratulations to the whole FotoFest team! They did it again! The shows that are made here during the Biennials are always of unprecedented quality. Everybody interested in visual arts should jump in a plane and rush to Houston, for what can be seen here deep in Texas you won’t find in cultural centres like New York, London or Paris!

…”

Read the full article here: http://www.loeildelaphotographie.com/2014/03/24/houston-fotofest-2014-the-diary-of-maarten-schilt

Read Maarten’s diary from his experience at FotoFest last week, published on L’Oeil de la Photographie:

"Friday March 14 my wife and business partner Maria Louise and I arrived in Houston for the 2014 FotoFest Biennial. It is always such a pleasure to be back in Houston! We love it here! The city is interesting and thriving, and the people are very kind and open.

We’ll be here for a week. In 4 days we’ll review work from about 70 mostly very talented photographers in the downtown DoubleTree Hotel, FotoFest’s headquarter during the Biennials. Of course we’ll attend the official opening and will see during the week the complete and huge show View From Inside on contemporary Arab photography, which is spread over four different locations: the Spring Street, Winter Street and Silver Street Studios, and Williams Tower. The first three are superbly renovated old industrial buildings located in Houston’s rapidly developing First Ward. Williams Tower is a beautiful 64 stories skyscraper designed by Philip Johnson in collaboration with both New York and Houston architects, and is located uptown. The ground floor of this chic office building is public exhibition space.

The Arab show is amazing. The work of 49 top quality artists from different Arab countries was selected by curator Karin Adrian von Roques, a German leading specialist in Arab art, together with FotoFest’s artistic Director and founder Wendy Watriss and her assistant Jennifer Ward. Congratulations to the whole FotoFest team! They did it again! The shows that are made here during the Biennials are always of unprecedented quality. Everybody interested in visual arts should jump in a plane and rush to Houston, for what can be seen here deep in Texas you won’t find in cultural centres like New York, London or Paris!

…”

Read the full article here: http://www.loeildelaphotographie.com/2014/03/24/houston-fotofest-2014-the-diary-of-maarten-schilt

Sunday, March 23, 2014

This evening we started the printing of World Press Photo Yearbook 2014 - a great start to the week here at Offizin Scheufele in Stuttgart!

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

theangrybat:

Chiara Tocci - Life after Zog

author: http://chiaratocci.com/

publisher: http://www.schiltpublishing.com/

ISBN: 978-90-5330-796-0

video: https://vimeo.com/85419234

Friday, March 7, 2014

theangrybat:

Anna Fox - Resort 1

author: http://annafoxnewspage.wordpress.com/

publisher: http://www.schiltpublishing.com/

ISBN: 978-90-5330-803-5

video: https://vimeo.com/85419227

Resort 1 by Anna Fox featured on The Angry Bat’s nice photobooks blog!

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

Also today we started printing the first books of our new series Magical Thinking including a first for Schilt Publishing - a book of paintings!

Read more about each book by following the link

'Probable Cause' by Matt Gunther

'One, No One, and One Hundred Thousand' by Nicholas Albrecht

'Iowa, Ohio' by Scott Daniel Ellison